Lynda Schlosberg

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Where the Process Creates the Answers
 


Archive for February, 2010

Regarding Frequencies

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Our earth’s frequency is 7.83 Hz, which is identical to human (alpha) brain waves.? With the advent of 900 MHz to 2.4 GHz portable phones, cellular phones, towers, satellite systems utilizing microwaves and our homes filled with every electronic gadget known to man, how is this not effecting our physical and mental processes? It seems safe to assume that our bodies, minds and spirit are being overloaded, overstimulated, or overrun by this influx of [and exposure to] these incredibly high amounts of electromagnetic energy fields.

Written by Lynda

February 24th, 2010 at 6:41 pm

Posted in Reflections

Emptiness and Form

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From The Heart Sutra, a famous Mahayana Buddhist text:

Form is no other than emptiness
Emptiness no other than form
All things are by nature void
They are not born or destroyed
Nor are they stained or pure
Nor do they wax or wane
Form is only emptiness
Emptiness only form

“It is pointing to the fact that we don’t see the world as it actually is. That things are not static, and fixed, and separate, the way that we tend to think of them being. But things are actually in flux, they are always changing, everything is impermanent, everything is interconnected. You can’t take one part of the Universe and separate it from the rest of the Universe because it is a part of that Universe, it’s interconnected inextricably with it.

“How can it be that things are not the way that we see them?
It is the mind that creates the illusion of separateness.
There are no boundaries.
Everything is not separate from everything else.
Everything is connected.
Everything is interconnected.
There isn’t any permanence.
There is always change.
It’s all one process.
And the mind picks various elements out of this process called the Universe,
and sees them as being separate, assumes that they are separate.”

–Bodhipaksa (Graeme Stephen) from the CD The Wisdom of the Breath: Three Guided Meditations for Calming the Mind and Cultivating Insight. Sounds True. 2009.

Written by Lynda

February 19th, 2010 at 4:02 pm

Posted in Reading Notes

Chitta, The Body of Concsiousness

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Chitta is our core consciousness–the internal ground of the mind. Consciousness, or the field of thought, is a quickly vibrating subtle energy field, which is the basis of all material manifestation.

The physical body consists of mainly heavy elements of water and earth and is a creation of gravity, which moves downward. Consciousness, on the other hand, is composed of lighter elements of ether and air, and is a creation of our thoughts, which like vapor move upward.

–Source: Ayurveda and the Mind: the Healing of Consciousness, by Dr. David Frawley. p77-78.

Written by Lynda

February 8th, 2010 at 7:50 am

Posted in Reading Notes

Where the process creates its own answers…

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It is uncertain on inception how I intend to fully utilize the function of this blog over time.

However, it is my initial intention to use it as a place to organize and distill information that I gather as I both expand and refine my artistic practice. I hope to include important notes from various readings, perhaps recent influential experiences, and even documentation of work in progress. A sort of 21st-century version of an artists professional journal.

While I ultimately believe this blogs existence is to serve my own use and purpose, and I am choosing (for now) to make this process open and transparent. So, please feel free to peruse the links to the right to read my professional journal by topic, or click here to read to my posts in chronological order. Keep in mind I’m not writing to anyone in particular other than myself…yet if you would like to add to this conversation, please feel free to post your comments.

Studio-Work in Progress, February 2010
> Studio Work in Progress, February 2010

Written by Lynda

February 7th, 2010 at 3:52 pm

Posted in Reflections

Short Inspirational Reads

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  • Art and Fear: Observations On The Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking, by David Bayles and Ted Orland
  • Letters to A Young Artist, Peter Nesbett, Shelly Bancroft, and Sarah Andress, editors
  • Single Exposures: Random Observations on Photography, Art and Creativity, edited by Brooks Jensen
  • The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks and Win Your Inner Creative Battles, by Steven Pressfield

Written by Lynda

February 7th, 2010 at 3:19 pm

Posted in Books

Reference Books

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  • A Short Guide to Writing About Art, by Sylvan Barnet
  • Handbook for Writers: Grammar, Punctuation, Diction, Rehtoric, Research, by Celia Millward
  • How to Write a Research Paper, from Sparknotes
  • MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, by Joseph Gibaldi
  • slide:ology: The Art and Science of Creating Great Presentations, by Nancy Duarte
  • The Craft of Research, by Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb and Joseph M. Williams

Written by Lynda

February 7th, 2010 at 3:12 pm

Posted in Books

On My Bookshelf

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  • A Brief Tour of Human Conciousness, by V.S. Ramachandran
  • A Field Guide to Getting Lost, by Rebecca Solnit
  • A Guide to Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception, edited by George J. Marshall
  • A New Earth, by Eckhart Tolle
  • Abstract Art (World of Art), by Anna Moszynska
  • Abstract Art, by Mel Gooding
  • Against Interpretation: And Other Essays, by Susan Sontag
  • Art and Objecthood, by Michael Fried
  • Art and Visual Perception: A Psychology of the Creative Eye, by Rudolf Arnheim
  • Artscience: Creativity in the Post-Google Generation, by David Edwards
  • Chromaphobia, by David Batchelor
  • Color in Art, by John Gage
  • Concsiousness Explained, by Daniel C. Dennett
  • Echo Objects: The Cognitive Work of Images, by Barbara Maria Stafford
  • Eyesight Alone: Clement Greenberg’s Modernism and the Bureaucratization of the Senses, by Caroline A. Jones
  • Formless: A User’s Guide, by Rosalind Kraus
  • Freud as Philosopher: Metapsychology After Lacan, by Richard Boothby
  • Good Looking: Essays on the Virtue of Images, by Barbara Maria Stafford
  • Insights of Genius: Imagery and Creativity in Science and Art, by Arthur I. Miller
  • Monet, Narcissus, and Self-Reflection: The Modernist Myth of the Self, by Steven Z. Levine
  • My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist’s Personal Journey, by Jill Bolte Taylor, PhD
  • On Abstract Art, by Briony Fer
  • Optic Nerve: Perceptual Art of the 1960′s, by Joe Houston
  • Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems, and the Economic World, by Kevin Kelly
  • Painting Machines: Industrial Image and Process in Contemporary Art: Boston University Art Gallery October 30-December 14, 1997, by Caroline A. Jones
  • Paths to the Absolute, by John Golding
  • Phenomonology of Perception, by Merleau Ponty, translated by Colin Smith
  • Pictures of Nothing: Abstract Art Since Pollack, by Kirk Varnedoe
  • Quantum Shift in the Global Brain: How the New Scientific Reality Can Change Us and Our World, by Ervin Laszlo
  • Simulacra and Simulation, by Jean Baudrillard
  • Technoromanticisim: Digital Narrative, Holism, an the Romance of the Real, by Richard Coyne
  • The Artful Eye, by Richard Gregory, John Harris, Priscilla Heard, and David Rose
  • The Book of Nothing: Vaccums, Voids, and the Latest Ideas About the Origins of the Universe, by John D. Barrow
  • The Cinematic Mode of Production: Attention Economy and the Society of the Spectacle, by Jonathan Beller
  • The Fabric of the Cosmos, by Brian Greene
  • The Infinite Line, by Briony Fer
  • The Infinte Book: A Short Guide to the Boundless, Timeless and Endless, by John D. Barrow
  • The Optical Unconscious, by Rosalind Krauss
  • The Phenomenology of Merleau-Ponty: A Search for the Limits of Consciousness, by Gary Brent Madison
  • The Sense of Order: A Study inthe Psychology of Decorative Art, by E.H. Gombrich
  • The Shadow of the Object: Psychoanalysis of the Thought Unknown, by Christopher Bollas
  • The Spiritual in Art: Abstract Painting 1890-1985, by Maurice Tuchman
  • Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, by Marshall McLuhan
  • Virtual Art: From Illusion to Immersion, by Oliver Grau
  • Visual Digital Culture: Surface Play and Spectacle in New Media Genres, by Andrew Darley
  • Ways of Seeing, by John Berger

Written by Lynda

February 7th, 2010 at 3:09 pm

Posted in Books

Morphogenetic Field

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“Rupert Sheldrake, in A New Science Life uses the term morphogenetic field to describe a dynamic field that links numerous individuals located all over. Each individual can affect the field, and each is simultaneously influenced by the field. The term morphic resonance is used to describe the effects of individual members upon the field and vice versa.”

–Source: How We Heal: Understanding the Mind-Body-Spirit Connection, by Douglas W. Morrison. p.32

Written by Lynda

February 7th, 2010 at 2:37 pm

Posted in Reading Notes